JustServe volunteers support MOMS baby shower in Dallas, Texas (2024)

As the two-year MOMS Tour travels around the United States, JustServe volunteers are helping before, during and after the community baby showers.

MOMS stands for Maternal Outcomes Matter Showers. The organizers are working to reach new and expectant mothers in communities with high maternal and infant mortality rates — including Black, American Indian and Alaska Native women.

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is supporting the organizers, which include A Chance to Learn and CocoLife.Black. New and expectant mothers are connected to local resources, doulas, education and supplies such as strollers, car seats and diapers.

On Saturday, Sept. 30, the baby shower was held in Dallas, Texas, with more than 300 expectant and new moms in attendance.

JustServe volunteers support MOMS baby shower in Dallas, Texas (1)

More than 300 participants attend a MOMS community baby shower in Dallas, Texas, Saturday, Sept. 30, 2023.

Miss Ari Photography

Volunteers signed up to help on JustServe — a website and app where organizations post their volunteer needs.

Kerri Zimmerman, assistant director for JustServe in the Dallas-Fort Worth area, said JustServe was honored to be invited to support and participate.

“The impact was particularly profound when witnessing immediate needs being met, such as a newborn baby being placed in a safe and age-appropriate stroller or a mother discovering a resource she didn’t even know was available,” she said.

Volunteers helped pack goodie bags with wipes, resources and supplies. Others helped pass out diapers and raffle prizes, such as strollers and maternity pillows.

They also helped with registration, in the healthy kitchen area and in a special kids corner where siblings could color or craft.

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“It was wonderful to see so many women have the opportunity to connect with organizations who offer valuable support and services to moms and their families,” Zimmerman said.

According to theCenters for Disease Control, Black women are three times more likely to die from pregnancy-related causes than white women. American Indian and Alaska Native women are twice as likely to die than white women, and 80% of pregnancy-related deaths were determined preventable.

And the United States Department of Health and Human Services has said non-Hispanic Black/African-American infants are almost four times as likely to die from complications related to low birthweight as compared to non-Hispanic white infants. Their mothers were twice as likely to receive late or no prenatal care.

JustServe volunteers support MOMS baby shower in Dallas, Texas (2)

MOMS Tour Manager LaToyia Dennis, left, works out details with Dallas-Fort Worth JustServe Assistant Director Kerri Zimmerman, far right, in Dallas, Texas, Saturday, Sept. 30, 2023.

Sharisa Lewis

LaToyia Dennis, MOMS Tour manager and founder of A Chance to Learn, faced life-threatening challenges in her pregnancies and numerous miscarriages.

“I want to ensure that I serve as an advocate for other moms of color as they matriculate through their journey,” Dennis said. “It’s my pleasure to serve as the fiscal agent and lived experience on the MOMS Tour.”

Booths gave expectant parents information on infant first aid, postpartum signs, finding a doula, prenatal care and Medicaid.

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After the event in Dallas, Zimmerman said “I am grateful for the volunteers who helped make it a great event and for relationships made with our new friends.”

After the first citywide baby shower in Chicago, Relief Society GeneralPresident Camille N. Johnsonsaid: “These opportunities to work with our friends in government and community are so important for us to touch the lives of [individuals]. We look at things globally, but we must also look at the needs of the one.”

As the MOMS Tour continues around the United States in coming months, there will be more efforts for JustServe volunteers in other cities to help with setting up, running the event and cleaning up afterward. Needs for donations are also posted onwww.justserve.org/themomstour.

See below for more pictures from the event.

JustServe volunteers support MOMS baby shower in Dallas, Texas (3)

Participants arrive at a MOMS community baby shower for support and assistance in Dallas, Texas, Saturday, Sept. 30, 2023.

Miss Ari Photography

JustServe volunteers support MOMS baby shower in Dallas, Texas (4)

LaToyia Dennis, MOMS Tour manager, comforts a baby at the community baby shower in Dallas, Texas, Saturday, Sept. 30, 2023.

Miss Ari Photography

JustServe volunteers support MOMS baby shower in Dallas, Texas (5)

Goodie bags stuffed by JustServe volunteers await participants at a MOMS community baby shower in Dallas, Texas, Saturday, Sept. 30, 2023.

Miss Ari Photography

JustServe volunteers support MOMS baby shower in Dallas, Texas (6)

Rev. Dr. Que English with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services encourages moms to be advocates of their health at a MOMS community baby shower in Dallas, Texas, Saturday, Sept. 30, 2023.

Miss Ari Photography

JustServe volunteers support MOMS baby shower in Dallas, Texas (7)

JustServe volunteer Michael Zimmerman, left, passes out raffle prizes such as car seats and strollers, donated by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, at a community baby shower in Dallas, Texas, Saturday, Sept. 30, 2023.

Sharisa Lewis

JustServe volunteers support MOMS baby shower in Dallas, Texas (8)

Kerri Zimmerman, right, serves alongside Alexia Doumbouya from CocoLife.Black at the MOMS community baby shower in Dallas, Texas, Saturday, Sept. 30, 2023.

Sharisa Lewis

Sharisa Lewis, Dallas-Fort Worth metro media assistant director for the Church, contributed to this report

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JustServe volunteers support MOMS baby shower in Dallas, Texas (2024)

FAQs

Who pays for the baby shower? ›

The hostess traditionally pays for the baby shower and its associated costs. However, the hostess can divide up the responsibility and costs by asking a few close family members or friends to co-host. This helps to reduce the overall expense and alleviates some of the financial obligation of hosting a baby shower.

Can a mom throw a baby shower for her daughter? ›

Because gifts are central to showers, having a member of the honoree's (or husband's) immediate family host appeared self-serving. Today it is appropriate for anyone to host a baby shower, as long as there's a legitimate reason.

What should a mother in law do for a baby shower? ›

Originally Answered: Can a mother-in-law host a baby shower? She can and some do. However, unless it's for the immediate family, proper etiquette requires that the shower should be hosted by a friend of the expectant mother and not a family member.

Who Organises a baby shower? ›

Typically, a close friend or family member will throw your shower, but coworkers or another loved one can host the party. While every baby shower is unique, the host usually takes care of organizing everything — so you can sit back and enjoy being celebrated.

How much money do you give someone for a baby shower? ›

We'll break it down by relationship: For coworkers or acquaintances, people tend to spend around $30 to $50. For friends or distant relatives, many people spend between $50 and $100. For close friends or family members, most people spend between $100 and $200 or more.

Can you just ask for money for baby shower? ›

Asking for money as a gift might feel uncomfortable or impersonal, but it can actually be a practical and thoughtful way to ensure you get exactly what you want or need. And surprisingly, we've found that a lot of givers actually prefer it!

Who should not host a baby shower? ›

No, it is terrible etiquette for a parent to host a shower (bridal or baby) for their adult children. The shower is normally given by a close friend, or two. Also, it should be noted that the invited guests should be close friends and family of the honoree, not friends of her parents.

Who not to invite to your baby shower? ›

As you create your guest list for your baby shower, you might wonder if there's anyone who shouldn't be invited. The simple answer is you can invite anyone you'd like to your shower.

How long should a baby shower be? ›

A baby shower usually lasts 2-3 hours. Budget about 30-45 minutes at the beginning for guests to arrive, nibble on some food, and mingle with one another before the games / entertainment begin. Spend the next 30-45 minutes playing games. And the rest of the time having cake and opening gifts.

What is the etiquette for grandmothers at baby showers? ›

While traditional baby showers are often all-afternoon affairs at a restaurant, a friend's home, or a banquet hall, grandmother showers should be more low-key. That means, a shorter celebration with only the grandma-to-be's nearest and dearest friends. DON'T create a registry.

Should mother in law be invited to all baby showers? ›

Mother-In-Law - Even if you don't have the best relationship with your mother-in-law, there is no excuse for not inviting her. She is your future child's grandmother after all! Father-In-Law - This would only be necessary if you will be having a co-ed shower.

Should my dad come to my baby shower? ›

While traditional baby showers consist of women only, co-ed baby showers are becoming more and more common. However, if you're looking to throw a traditional baby shower and still have the dad-to-be attend, this is completely acceptable and appropriate as most dad-to-be's will want to thank guests before they leave.

What if no one offers to throw you a baby shower? ›

This can be tricky. If you have announced that you are having a baby and no one has offered to throw you a shower by 15-20 weeks, here are some things you can do: Subtly mention to your mom, sister, mother-in-law, sister-in-law, and best friends that no one has offered to throw you a shower.

Which day is best for baby shower? ›

Baby showers can be held at any point but are typically held four to six weeks before the baby's due date. This timing is late enough that the pregnancy is well along but likely early enough to avoid the baby arriving beforehand and disrupting the party plans.

Is the baby shower for the mom or dad? ›

While traditional baby showers consist of women only, co-ed baby showers are becoming more and more common. However, if you're looking to throw a traditional baby shower and still have the dad-to-be attend, this is completely acceptable and appropriate as most dad-to-be's will want to thank guests before they leave.

Do baby showers honor mom or baby? ›

Traditionally, the mother-to-be is the guest of honor at the baby shower. That said, if you're hosting a couples' shower, then you should list both parents as the guests of honor.

Can the mother of the mother give a baby shower? ›

Though in many cases the hostess is a sister or friend nothing prevents a mother from hosting the shower. The only thing that would be considered unusual would be if the mother to be hosted her own baby shower.

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